How To Plan Healthcare Needs When Moving To New Area

Moving to a brand new area can be both exciting and stressful. Loving families get a fresh start and new opportunities. But starting over in a new community also requires significant due diligence. Along with identifying the best schools and recreational offerings, you need to understand the healthcare landscape. 

If you plan to relocate, consider the following healthcare items carefully.

Identify and Enlist Healthcare Providers

Finding a primary care physician often tops the list of a family’s focus when moving. That’s certainly a reasonable concern, given that the primary physician provides comprehensive care and will come to know your health intimately. Therefore, families should quickly identify the following healthcare professionals.

  • Pediatricians: Growing families generally need a go-to doctor if children show symptoms beyond routine and seasonal ailments. It may prove helpful to secure a list of pediatricians in your primary’s network to ensure communication remains seamless.
  • OB/GYN: It’s not uncommon for women to consider an OB/GYN more essential than their primary doctor. Finding a person who is both experienced and women feel comfortable with can be something of a challenge. In addition, it may prove invaluable to ask other women in the community who they see and why that doctor is a good fit.

It’s also helpful to know what specialists have offices in the community and how far away others are located. For example, people who live outside major cities may discover they must travel for specialized treatment and care.

Access to Emergency and Urgent Care Facilities

The ability to get to an emergency room or urgent care facility ranks among the invaluable treatment assets. A well-staffed emergency room generally includes an ER doctor and an experienced physician’s assistant to diagnose sudden conditions.

When moving to a new town, it’s essential to understand that not every facility operates 24/7. That’s why taking notes about available services and hours can make a significant difference in your life. The availability of these healthcare services could emerge as an important relocation factor.

Access to Mental Health Professionals

Moving to a new community typically creates some uncertainty and anxiety. Studies also indicate that frequent moves may result in heightened psychosocial stress and feelings of exhaustion. Although the joys of a new living space can prove uplifting, it might still come with challenges for some. Those are why having a therapist and other mental health resources in place before the moving trucks arrive is crucial.

Determine the Heath Care Cost Differences

When families move to a new state, the health insurance system can differ immensely. To say the cost of healthcare and prescription drugs has become uneven would be something of an understatement. Consumers often discover that an established pharmacy charges far higher prices than another just blocks away. That’s why everyday people may want to identify how much companies charge and which accept discount cards. The combination can save a significant amount of money.

The same holds for health insurance plans that often offer complicated deductibles and co-pays. Check with your provider to make sure co-pays and coverage will continue with the same payment schedules. Better to make changes before moving than incur an unexpected bill.

Moving Help

Working families have a lot on their plate when moving to a new community. Enlisting the assistance of a moving company can help alleviate stress and give you more time to ensure your healthcare needs are in place. Contact us today for a free quote.

Moving With Little Ones In Tow: Helping Your Toddler Feel At Home In Their New Room

When you’re moving with a young child, it’s normal for emotions to run high. For example, your toddler may be excited about moving into a new home while also feeling sad about leaving their old house (and friends) behind. 

Check out these tips for helping your little one begin to feel comfortable and at home in their new room after you move to your new home. 

1. Prepare Appropriately 

When you’re packing up your home, pack your child’s room last. While it can be tough to have your child around while you’re packing, involve them as much as you can in putting their belongings into boxes. It’s wise to talk to one of your child’s stuffed animals as you pack up their things, saying things like “we’ll see you when we get to the new house!” before placing a beloved toy into a box. 

Remind your child that their things aren’t being thrown away and that they’ll be waiting for them at your new home. Allow your child space to express their feelings, and remember that it’s ok and normal for them to feel sad, angry, or frustrated as you go through the packing process.

2. Unpack Your Child’s Room First 

When you arrive at your new home, unpack your child’s room as soon as possible. While it may be tempting to replace furniture or implement a new decorative scheme in their new room, you’ll want to try to make their new space as familiar as possible. When packing, be sure to mark all of your child’s items clearly so that you’re able to locate them when you begin organizing your new home. 

3. Keep Bedtime Routines as Uniform As Possible 

Routine is essential for toddlers to feel safe and secure, and sticking to their bedtime routine can help them gain a sense of comfort as they settle into their new space. While it can be tempting to rush through bedtime so you can get back to unpacking, take your time to help your little one begin to adjust. 

4. Consider Using a Baby Monitor

Even if you stopped using a baby monitor at your old home, it might be time to pull it out and use it at your new home until your child has adjusted to the new environment. 

When your toddler wakes up at night, it can be scary and disorienting to realize that they’re in an unfamiliar room. Using a baby monitor may help you comfort them faster than waiting for their cries to reach your room. When you go into your child’s room to comfort them, reassure them that they’re safe, that you’re in your new home, and all their favorite stuffed animals and toys are right there with them. It may help to use a night light to help them get more comfortable with their surroundings

Is Moving Day Approaching? We’d Love To Help. 

Relocating can be tricky, especially when you’re moving with kids. We’re here to help take some of the stress out of your move. Reach out to us today for a free price quote on our moving services.

Moving in Winter? Benefits of an Off-Season Move

Are you planning a move soon? If so, you’re not alone; every year, more than 40 million Americans — about 13 percent — make a move. More than half of these moves take place between May and September.

Summer is, by far, the busiest moving season. A summer move makes sense for many because the kids are on school break, or their work schedule is a bit more flexible. Summer is also peak housing selling and buying time, and — let’s face it — moves may be less challenging when it’s not freezing outside.

But moving during the summer comes at a price: It’s more expensive to move and possibly more challenging to find a moving company during this busy time. Moving in winter instead offers advantages. Read on to discover the benefits of an off-season move.

The Bottom Line: Cost

Moving companies are in great demand during the spring and summer months. Often, schedules stay booked well into the fall. Higher demand usually means higher prices.

After October, though, prices generally decrease. Thanks to a greater availability, movers may have more flexibility when it comes to pricing. In addition, you may discover discounts and special offers that help you save money on your move.

Moving Company Availability

When you’re moving during peak season, reserving your moving company as far in advance as you can is key. The most reputable movers are often booked many months ahead of time.

Unfortunately, life doesn’t always cooperate and allow you to plan ahead. But if you wait too long, you may have to settle for whatever’s left. You may have to compromise on your dates, times, and the services you want, as well. 

In contrast, winter schedules aren’t usually as packed. So while planning ahead is always a good idea, securing an excellent household moving company for a winter move might require less lead time. In addition, you’ll be competing for your preferred dates with fewer people, so you’re more likely to get the time and date you want.

Temperature and Humidity

Moving in summer means not worrying about snow and ice. But moving in warm temperatures — especially with high humidity — isn’t pleasant, either. 

Loading and unloading boxes and heavy furniture in the heat is physically tricky and exhausting. Moving items into a non-climate-controlled storage unit in the summer heat can cause damage, as well. 

So while you might not relish the thought of moving while the snow falls, there are advantages that come with beating the heat.

Less Traffic and Road Congestion

All too often, moving in summer means dealing with congested roadways. As a result, traffic volumes peak in summer and decline through the winter months. 

More cars on the road probably mean more congestion, and that sets up the possibility that it might take longer for your moving truck to get to your new home. In addition, moving trucks must navigate traffic on the roads and at weight stations and truck stops. A winter move helps reduce these potential issues.

If you’re fortunate enough to choose when to move, consider passing on peak season. A winter move in the off-season offers several advantages that may just make your move smoother.

Make Your Winter Move

Contact us for a free moving quote. We can help make your wintertime move a smooth one.

4 Inexpensive Ways to Spruce Up the Kitchen in Your Rental

Outdated or drab kitchen space can make it hard to be enthusiastic about cooking meals. Unfortunately, if you’re moving into a new rental home or apartment, you don’t typically have many options to make significant changes. The good news is there are a few inexpensive ways you can quickly spruce up your new-to-you kitchen without violating your lease or spending a lot of money. Of course, check with your landlord first before tackling these projects. 

1. Paint Kitchen Walls

It’s amazing how a simple coat (or two!) of paint can completely transform a room. Covering up a bland white or outdated color with a layer of fresh paint can do wonders to improve the mood and feel of a kitchen. Most landlords or property managers are okay if you choose a color that is easy to paint over once you leave, especially if you offer to bring it back to white or another neutral color before you depart. Ideally, if you have time before your upcoming move, do the painting before bringing your belongings in; it’ll make things easier during your first few weeks in your new home.

2. Use Organizational Strategies

Many rentals come with small kitchens that offer little in terms of storage space. This typically results in cluttered counters on already limited surfaces or a table that you can’t use since it’s serving as a storage area. However, easy, inexpensive ways you can plan to add storage and organization (before you even unpack to reduce clutter on counters) and make more room in cabinets include:

  • Install hanging space for pots and pans.
  • Add a pegboard to hang cookware and other food prep essentials.
  • Use portable storage shelves to insert in cabinets and pantries to double the space.
  • Place cutlery trays inside drawers – alternately, use drawer dividers that work with spring tension to separate space.
  • Use hooks to hang mugs or add racks to hang stemware.
  • Purchase a rolling kitchen island, ideally with a butcher block surface and a shelf or cubby underneath, that is easily portable.

These and other organizational solutions can go a long way towards freeing up space throughout the kitchen. Plus, many of them also add a level of convenience for those high-need daily items.

3. Upgrade Lighting

Many older kitchens have dim or inefficient lighting, which can impact the look of the room. The good news is many fixtures are easy to replace and don’t require bringing in a professional. Buy a vintage light fixture online, or go with a sleek modern option. Other options you can do is add portable lighting to hang over the stove or LED strip lights underneath the cabinets – some of these can be set on timers, or you can use a remote. Or try using plants and other strategies for a creative way to perk up the plainness.

4. Add Accents Throughout the Kitchen

Sometimes it’s the simple things that can make a world of difference. Add artwork, removable borders to the walls, toss down a pretty throw rug, update cabinet hardware, change outlet plates for outlets and light switches, hanging plants, or cover the refrigerator with removable wallpaper or photo prints.

Moving Made Easy!

If you’re planning an upcoming move and have any questions, we’re happy to help. Contact us today for a free quote.

Packing 101: The Five Golden Rules of Proper Box Packing

You’ve got your collection of boxes and packing supplies, and now it’s time to tackle the monumental task ahead of you: packing up your small belongings for the move. To save time, protect your belongings, and make unpacking more manageable than ever, there are five golden rules for packing a box to keep in mind as you work. 

1. Place Heavier Items on the Bottom

Warehouse workers are trained to always pack heavier items at the bottom of their boxes and keep fragile items at the top. Follow this same golden rule when packing for a household move. Anything heavy should go on the bottom to give the box stability and prevent damage to anything lighter in weight and more fragile. So, using a random collection of home office items as an example, your box-packing order may look something like this: 

  1. Books and paperweights on bottom 
  2. Pencil holders in the middle 
  3. Picture frames on top 

2. Keep the Weight of the Box in Check

The general rule is to keep any packed box at 50 pounds or less. But, also keep in mind that all boxes can have their own weight limits. For example, you may be perfectly comfortable moving a 50-pound box, but a smaller carton may have a lower weight limit than that. If possible, keep your bathroom scale handy while you pack so you can keep weight limits in check to protect yourself from injury and protect your boxes from accidental damage. 

3. Wrap Anything Fragile

You should wrap any items prone to breakage in transit before putting them into a box. Most people remember to wrap up the most fragile things during a move—glass, for example. However, many other items are prone to breakages, such as items with many parts, things made of thin wood, and items with delicate features. 

4. Fill Dead Spaces in the Box

Dead space within a box is any space that is left unfilled. Space is bad because it leaves room for the items within the box to shift and move, leading to damage. Therefore, you want to keep gaps in the box to a minimum while you pack. For example, if you are packing glass figurines, wrap those figurines and then use a filler material or even towels and t-shirts to fill the dead spaces and keep the items from shifting. 

5. Pack Items From the Same Room

This golden rule is more about saving you time and making things easy on you when you unpack. By packing items from the same room together in the same box, you can make more progress while you pack. You can clear a room a lot faster so you can move to the next space. Likewise, when you start unpacking, you can work in one designated area to empty the box. 

Enlist the Help of Residential Movers 

Even well-packed boxes can be a lot to contend with on your own when you face a move. But, bringing professionals in to get your belongings on a truck and relocated to the new place can make all the difference. Ready to get a free moving quote? Contact us today to get started. 

Selling Your Home In Autumn: 5 Tips

Autumn is a time when leaves fall, temperatures drop, and the days get shorter. These conditions can present challenges for homeowners who want to sell. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to ensure that your home is attractive to buyers. By taking steps to improve your curb appeal, ensure your home is comfortable and bright indoors, you can sell your house quicker and perhaps for more money.

1. Keep the Lawn Clear

As dead leaves fall from the trees and perennial plants die back for the season, many lawns fill with debris to be cleared. Keep your yard clear by cutting back perennial plants that have dried up. Rake leaves beneath trees.

If you keep dead leaves in a pile on your lawn, keep the pile out of view from home buyers. Rake your yard before each home showing, especially if your trees are losing lots of leaves. Not only do leaves make your lawn look messy, but they can also remind homebuyers how much work your lawn is in the fall — and that’s no good!

2. Maintain a Comfortable Temperature Indoors During Showings

This is not the time to save money on HVAC costs. Instead, keep your home appropriately comfortable to ensure that it is comfortable for buyers when they come to see your house. Buyers can show up unexpectedly, so it’s best to keep your house at a comfortable temperature during the day.

3. Put Out Seasonal Decorations (But Don’t Go Overboard)

Seasonal decorations can help your home feel cozy in the fall. It’s a good idea to hang a fall wreath or put a fall table setting in the middle of your dining room table. That said, keep your decorations tasteful, attractive, and understated.

Avoid over-the-top decorations like bright or colorful Halloween decorations. The purpose of your decorations is to set a mood but not overpower your buyers with your seasonal spirit. Bright decorations can distract buyers from the other features of your home, and that’s not helpful.

4. Turn On Lights Everywhere

Fall is a time when the days grow short, and homes can be dark on the inside. So keep the lights on in your house when you’re showing it to buyers. Replace all burned-out light bulbs before the first showing, and keep all lights on – especially if a showing occurs in the evening or at night.

5. Put Out Autumn Scented Candles

Autumn has its own scents, and most people find those scents comforting. So put out autumn-scented candles to get your buyers in the spirit. You don’t even have to light your candles – just set them out and let the smells make your home more welcoming to buyers.

Moving Soon? Contact a Reputable Moving Company

It’s essential to work with a reputable moving company when you’re moving. For example, if you’re selling your house, that may mean you need a moving company that can safely transport your possessions from one home to another.

Working with a good moving company will take the stress off your relocation, so you can spend more time thinking about making your house attractive to buyers. Contact us; we can make your relocation a success. 

How To Hold A Successful Moving Sale

The weeks leading up to a household move can get pretty hectic. One way to alleviate some stress is to get organized and offload possessions you don’t need. Holding a moving sale is an ideal way to downsize, save on moving costs, and put extra cash in your pocket. Here are seven tips for having a successful moving sale.

1. Select a Date and Time

Generally, the best days for moving sales are on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Plan to hold your sale for at least two days. Set a date as soon as possible once you know you’re moving. This way, if you don’t sell as much as you’d like, you can either hold a second moving sale, sell items online, or have time to donate them. Next, choose a start and end time. Try to plan the sale early in the morning; 7 or 8 a.m. is usually the best time. (Keep in mind, you’re also likely to get early birds regardless of the time.)

2. Ask Neighbors if They Want to Join In

The more, the merrier! Ask neighbors if they’d be interested in participating in a multi-family yard sale event. The larger the sale, the chances more buyers will attend. Plus, it’s easier to spread the word about the sale with more neighbors involved.

3. Be Sure to Advertise

Dropping a post on Facebook is helpful, but it isn’t going to be enough to have a successful sale. Use different advertising techniques, including Craigslist, placing flyers at grocery stores and other high traffic areas, and posting bright-colored posters in and around the neighborhood.

Pro Tip: Before posting signs, check with local officials and HOAs to ensure you don’t break any rules.

4. Set Prices for Each Item

Evaluate the items planned to be sold and set fair pricing. If unsure, look on eBay or other online sales spaces to see what similar things are going for. Be sure when you plan for pricing to remember that people will try to barter and go into the sale willing to negotiate. Items truly worth more money than you’re ready to negotiate might be better off sold online or at a consignment shop.

5. Tag Each Item

Tag each item with its own sticker and place it in an easy-to-see location. It’s sometimes helpful to use colored tags (e.g., high and low-priced items or if it’s a multi-family sale) to help differentiate where needed.

6. Plan for Tables, Baskets, and Blankets

Get as organized as possible and eliminate the possibility that possessions you don’t want to sell aren’t comingled with the items for sale. Set up tables, place smaller, non-breakable items in baskets, and layout blankets. Having an organized display makes your things look more appealing, and it’s easier to keep track of what you are selling.

7. Establish a ‘Register’ for Payments

Have a separate table to handle transactions. Items you’ll need include:

  • Cash box with plenty of change
  • Calculator
  • Scissors, tape, and packing paper (for fragile items)
  • Plastic bags, boxes, etc.

Be sure to designate someone to always be at the “register” at all times during the sale.

Moving Made Easy

Holding a sale is a great way to reduce clutter, simplify packing, and reduce moving costs. Need help with an upcoming move? Contact us today for a free quote.

How to Pack a Kitchen

A kitchen is one of the most challenging rooms to pack when moving. Dishes and glassware are fragile, and many items have diverse shapes and sizes. However, through planning and a step-by-step approach, you can successfully pack this room.

Sort and Simplify

The first step is to sort and separate those items you want to take from those you will give away or sell in a garage sale.  A rule of thumb is that if you’ve not used it in six months, don’t move it.

Set Aside Essentials 

Set aside enough dishes, cutlery, small appliances, and pots for your last two days in your old home. After everything else is packed, you’ll use these and then wash and pack them up in an essentials box to use in the first days in your new home.

Assemble Packing Materials

You’ll need moving boxes, packing tape, packing paper, cell kits, and a marker. Packing paper is better than bubble wrap because it is more flexible and takes up less space. While some people use newsprint, plain packing paper works better because it won’t transfer ink to your dishes. 

And markers to label each box. 

Pack Infrequently Used Items First

Start by packing those items you don’t use as frequently. These might include extra dish towels, large roasting pans, pictures, and unusual utensils such as barbecue tongs. It also will likely include fragile items such as vases, crystals, and wine glasses. Pack the fragile items carefully, wrapping them properly and inserting them into the cell kits. Indicate which boxes contain fragile things so that the movers can use caution when handling those cartons.

The artwork also requires careful handling. You can group small and medium-sized artwork, but larger pictures will need to be packed separately in a box slightly larger than the frame. If the frame has a glass covering, put tape across it in the shape of an X.

Pack Unopened Bottles

Alcohol, olive oil, vinegar, and other bottled items also can be packed early in the process. To maximize your budget, be sure that the item’s weight is worth the cost to move it. For example, a bottle of fine wine may be worth moving, but a bottle of inexpensive vinegar may not be.

Pack Drawers and Shelves

Pack drawers and shelves. If you haven’t already done so, remove those that you haven’t used and find a new home for them.

Pack Dishes

Tape the bottom of the box along the seam and then across it several times to ensure the bottom doesn’t open up.

Then start with the plates because they are the heaviest. Ball up some packing paper to create a cushion. Then wrap the plates carefully, one at a time, and put them in the box vertically (standing on their side.) Pack additional paper along the sides so that they do not move and at the top for cushioning.

After the plates, wrap the bowls individually and pack them on their sides as a second layer. Place another layer of paper on top as a cushion. Close the box.

Use cell boxes for the glasses, wrapping each one before placing it in the cell.

Pack Pots, Pans, and Pantry

Pack all but the one all-purpose pot you set aside for the essentials box. When packing your pantry, start with the spices first, then work your way to the larger items.

We Can Help Get You There

For more expert tips and a free quote, contact us. We can help with your packing, transport, unpacking, and the details in between.

Tips on Downsizing and Decluttering for Your Move

Downsizing and decluttering are an integral part of the moving process. In addition, if you’re selling your home, decluttering will make the home more appealing to potential buyers.

However, downsizing and decluttering can help your move go more smoothly, even if you’re not selling a home. The more you can dispose of, the less you’ll have to pack and unpack. As a result, downsizing and decluttering also can reduce the cost of your move.

Here are some tips on downsizing and decluttering.

Start Early

A good rule of thumb is to start at least three months before your move, but the earlier, the better. If you can start early, you’ll leave yourself time to sort through your home without feeling overwhelmed.

Determine a Method

Several methods exist for downsizing your home. In the KonMari way, you take one category at a time and give away any items that no longer spark joy. In the one-a-day method, you let go of one thing each day or the number of items that match that day of the month. So, for example, if today were the 15th, you’d discard 15 items.

Another method is the four-box method, which restricts what you can do by only giving you four options. You either keep the item, donate it, toss it, or sell it. You avoid putting things in storage.

Have a Goal

If you already have found a new place to live, you’ll determine your downsizing goal based on the size of your new home. First, measure the rooms to know whether or not your large pieces of furniture will fit. Also, measure the closet, pantry, shelf, and storage spaces within the home.

Consider Your Lifestyle

When determining whether an item will fit in your new home, measurements aren’t the only criteria. A home indicates a lifestyle, and your lifestyle may change with the move.

For example, suppose you move from a home in the suburbs to a condo in the city. You won’t need any lawn care equipment. You also may not need exercise equipment if your condo building has a gym.

As another example, suppose you are moving to your retirement home. You won’t need most of your professional clothes, briefcases, and other items you used on the job.

Go Digital

Sort through all your paper files. You may be able to discard many of them, and you can also convert them to digital. Home movies, music, and photographs also can be preserved digitally.

Start from the Bottom 

When cleaning out closets, start with the items on the floor first, then work your way to the items on hangers. This method gives you space to work. It also boosts your confidence because the job will appear closer to being finished.

Divvy Up Sentimental Items

If sentimental items don’t fit into your new home, consider giving them to relatives or friends who also have a connection to the item. In addition, you can retain the memory by taking a digital photo of the item and writing a description of its significance.

Down to the Basics for Your Move

If you are moving soon, contact us. We can provide you with a free quote and excellent service to get you to your new home stress-free.

Packing Attic or Basement Storage: How to Minimize Along the Way

For many people, miscellaneous items that end up in the attic or basement are rarely used. So when preparing for a move, you can quickly realize just how much stuff you have collected in these spaces. Unfortunately, some of these extra belongings can just add to the load when you may not even use the stuff often enough to keep. So here are a few good tips for minimizing the number of things you have to pack in your attic or basement before moving.

1. Pull everything out of the space first.

Some basements and attics can be cramped, which means they may not be the best place to assess all you have stored in the area. Therefore, an excellent tip to remember as you pack before moving is to get everything moved to a site where you can better assess the collection. This also offers a twofold advantage of physically handling everything, which means looking at each item and deciding whether it is worth keeping. 

2. Organize everything into storage containers.

Pick up some suitable storage containers with lids. Opt for stackable versions. These containers can be packed, transported, and then restored with ease in the new house. A few good features to look for include: 

  • Sturdy handles and not handles built into the lids 
  • Secure-fit lids 
  • Proper fill weight for what you intend to store 
  • Clear bins for easy visibility if that’s important 

Once you have your storage bins, label them or do what you need to designate the container for a specific purpose. 

3. Look at what does not belong.

Once you have filled the containers with items from your basement or attic, look at the things you still have that don’t necessarily have a place to go. Attics and basements can become catch-alls for many items that may be more logical in other areas in the house. For example, if you find various hand tools, it’s better to pack those with items from the garage. 

4. Pull out what you haven’t used in over a year.

After organizing your collection and ensuring everything is in its place, you might have some other items you don’t necessarily need to take with you. Minimalist tips can help you if you are struggling to let go of things. Consider: 

  • Is this an item you actually use
  • Does the item have personal or tangible value
  • Is the item worth the space it consumes

These questions can be helpful so you can sift out what will never be used or what would be best donated, which can truly help you lighten the load during your move. 

Get Packing With the Help of Moving Pros 

From the basement to the attic and every space in between, packing up a home can be a lot of work. To make sure your big transition is not so stressful, be sure to enlist the help of a moving company. Reach out to us so we can offer a free moving quote today.