5 Things to Do After You Move

After months of house hunting, preparation, and packing, you’re moving day is right around the corner.

You’re close to the finish line, but there are a few steps left in the moving process before you can sit back and relax in your new home.

Here’s a to-do list to help you complete the few tasks that remain.

1. Perform a Walkthrough

Before you fill your new home with furniture and moving boxes, do a walkthrough. It’s easier to get this critical task done in an empty house. Focus on:

  • Ensuring previous owners completed agreed-upon repairs
  • Checking that appliances, outlets, and fixtures function properly
  • Making sure everything that was supposed to be included with the sale is present

Document any issues; for instance, if the previous owners said they’d fix a broken door but didn’t, or were supposed to leave the refrigerator, but took it with them instead.

Performing a walkthrough in an empty house will also allow you to find any issues that need to be fixed later.

2. Find the Water Shut-Off and Fuse Box

Before you start moving in your things, locate the electrical fuse box and your water shut-off valve. Often, the fuse box is in the garage, basement, or storage room.

In case of an emergency, you might need to turn off the water quickly, so you’ll want to know exactly where the water valve is. In most cases, you’ll find the valve on a perimeter wall on the street-facing side of your home. If you can’t find the valve, pull out your inspection report; the inspector should have noted its location in the “plumbing” section.

3. Change the Locks

Call a locksmith and change the locks to your new home. Even if you trust the previous owners, you still don’t know how many spare keys are floating around.

Change the locks on every outside door to the house. If your main doors are missing deadbolts, ask the locksmith to install those, too.

If the garage door has a keypad or an alarm system, now is the ideal time to change the codes.

4. Do a Deep Clean

While the house is still empty, grab some cleaning supplies and get to work. A deep clean will help make you feel more comfortable and at home.

If you can’t spare much time, focus on the kitchen and bathrooms. Wiping down the inside of cabinets, polishing the counters, and scrubbing the floors make your fresh start feel genuinely new.

5. Unpack With Purpose

It’s finally time to unpack! But don’t just pile boxes willy-nilly; unpacking in an organized manner will save you time and effort later.

Start with the rooms you use most: the bedroom and the bathroom. After all, you’re probably more than ready to take a hot shower and get some rest after the stress of moving day.

As you unpack the rest of your belongings, take inventory as you go. This will help you ensure that all of your belongings made it safely to your new home.

Moving Made Easy

The most efficient way to complete a move is with the help of professional movers. If you need some help over the finish line, contact us for a free quote. We can help get you the rest of the way there — into your new home!

How to Solve the Biggest Unforeseeable Moving Day Problems

Imagine you have planned for every foreseeable moving scenario. You’ve downloaded and filled out a moving checklist, set a to-the-minute timeline, packed diligently, and even purchased moving insurance. What could possibly go wrong? You might be surprised!

The root cause of moving problems can be traced back to a single idea — unforeseeable circumstances. Whether these involve elements beyond your control or garden variety human error, the result tends to be the same. You suffer moving day problems, and the experience devolves into stress and anxiety. The good news is that the following covers issues that you cannot necessarily anticipate. But if and when they do, you’ll be prepared to get through them.

How To Deal With Extreme Weather

Forecasting the weather may be the only occupation people can predict inaccurately more often than not and keep their job. Planning ahead by checking 10-day patterns provides little solace when you get stung by severe weather on moving day. These are three types of extreme weather that can derail a scheduled move unless you are prepared to negotiate them.

  • Heavy Snow: Freezing rain and blizzard conditions can make moving day a risky proposition. Fewer people move during the winter months because of these unpredictable weather conditions. A few-hour delay may be in order if you live in an area with good plowing and road sanding practices. But if the roads are unlikely to be safe that day, better to postpone.
  • Torrential Downpours: Hard rains make driving conditions unsafe. They also can result in flash flooding. The last thing anyone wants is to be involved in an accident that results in injury or property damage. It’s advisable to wait out torrential downpours and make sure your moving route has not been compromised.
  • Extreme Heat: When temperatures soar into the 90s or higher, it may be wise to expand the timetable. Safety dictates that you should only perform vigorous activity early in the morning or after late afternoon. Avoid working during peak sunlight and heat whenever possible.

Perhaps the best solution involves discussing a so-called “rain date” with the moving company—factor in unforeseeable weather events by including a flexible timetable.

Issues at Your New Home

Unexpected challenges might also come up when you arrive at your new home. Most of these problems will have easy solutions that you can prepare for. 

  • Utilities: Keep the contact information of your utility providers readily available if there’s an issue with your gas, electricity, or other services when you arrive. Ensure you have an emergency kit as part of your essentials supplies that include flashlights, candles, water, and some nonperishable food.
  • Handyman: Make sure you have the number of a local handyman or your landlord handy if there is an emergency with your new home.
  • Essential supplies: Gather your essential supply kit while you pack your home so that if you run into any problems on moving day or need to check into a hotel, you have what you need.

Furniture Too Bulky To Get Through The New Door

Not measuring furniture to determine whether it fits through the new home’s doorway occurs more often than you might think. Most people already know their belongings fit through door “A” because it was delivered to them. But not all entrances are created equal, and a narrow opening often proves problematic.

There are several ways to resolve an oversized furniture problem, although some may seem unenviable. Take the door off the hinges to gain a couple of inches in width. Remove the item’s legs and dismantle it if possible. If that fails, you can sell it, buy slimmer furniture or call a carpenter. It may not seem like a desirable solution, but door frames and large windows can be removed temporarily and put back after the furniture is inside the home. A good carpenter can make it seem as if nothing was removed. Make sure you have a small tool kit pack in your essential supply kit. It will come in handy right away at your new home.

Moving Assistance

The best way to overcome moving day problems is to work with an experienced professional company that has negotiated these and other issues before. When selecting a reputable moving company, don’t hesitate to ask them “what if” something goes wrong.

Contact us for a free quote.

How To Pack Glassware for Your Relocation

Glassware is fragile, so packing glassware is one of the most labor-intensive moving tasks of your residential move. While packing glassware does take some time, your glassware will arrive at your new home just as fresh as when it left your old one if done correctly.

Here are some steps to successfully packing your glassware:

Gather Materials

You’ll need:

  • Boxes. If possible, obtain a cell box, which places dividers between each glass, from your moving company.
  • Packing material such as blankets, towels, socks, packing paper, newspapers, or bubble wrap. Keep in mind, however, that bubble wrap is expensive and hard to recycle. Newsprint sometimes bleeds onto items; packing paper does not. You may be able to obtain free packing paper from your mover or The Freecycle Network, or Craig’s list.
  • Packing tape
  • Marker

Line the Box

Use blankets, towels, crumpled packing paper, or other soft materials to line the entire box — top, bottom, and sides. This protects your glassware from every angle.

Wrap

Wrap each glass individually in packing paper. For each glass, start by putting the packing paper inside the glass. Then fold both sides up and around the edges. As you roll, tuck the sides in.

Bubble wrap can stick to glass and break it. If you use bubble wrap, use packing paper, and then add a bubble wrap layer for extra protection.

Double wrap each piece, regardless of what type of packing material you are using. If you are wrapping wine glasses, remember to wrap the stems first. Pack wine glasses last so that they are closest to the soft material packed at the top of the box.

Pack

Place each glass or piece of stemware into its cell in the cell box. Fill any empty space with crumpled packing paper or socks or air pillows. Pack the box about three inches from the top and fill it with these soft packing materials until closing the box is difficult. This helps prevent breakage if something is placed on top of the boxes.

Tape

Shake the box gently to be sure the contents don’t shift or that you don’t hear glasses linking. Once you’re satisfied, tape the box shut. Use the marker to label the box’s contents and indicate which room it should go to at the new house. Be sure to also write “Fragile” on the box in large letters.

Packing Bowls and Dishes

To pack dishes safely, line the boxes in the same way you lined the glasses boxes. Group plates by size, then wrap each dish in paper or other soft material and place each into the box on its side. Avoid stacking them if you can, as stacking could cause crushing damage.

Do the same with bowls. Stuff any spaces in the box with soft items until closing it is difficult. Then seal with tape, label, and mark “Fragile.”

If You Need Help

As a full-service mover, we can provide boxes and packing materials. We also can pack glassware, dishes, and other items for you, saving you time and worry. The cost is often less than you think. Give us a call today.

5 Things Your Professional Movers May Not Move for You and Why

When you face a move from your current home to a new place, you face the enormous task of getting all your belongings from point A to point B. Bringing in professional movers for help is always a good decision. The pros can step in and do the heavy lifting for you by loading and hauling your belongings where they need to go. However, certain items may not be safe to transport in a moving truck.

Here are just some of the items that are prohibited.

1. Live Animals or Pets

Most moving companies will not handle live animals or pets. While you may already anticipate that you will have to transport your usual pets like a cat or a dog, you may find it surprising that some movers will also not handle things like live fish, birds, or reptiles. In general, pets can pose risks to the other items being moved, but pets and other live animals can also be prone to injury during transport.

2. Corrosive Materials

In general, a product is considered corrosive if it will deteriorate surfaces or the skin. Corrosive materials can pose risks to the rest of your belongings when placed on a moving truck, but they can also pose a risk to the movers who may be handling these products. A few examples of corrosive materials you may find around your home include:

  • Rust removal products
  • Bleach
  • Oven cleaner
  • Drain cleaner
  • Lead-acid batteries
  • Paint stripper

3. Combustible or Flammable Items

Combustibles and flammables are products that can either explode or catch on fire when exposed to specific environments or agents. In general, professional movers do not handle these items because they can pose such a risk. For example, the enclosed trailer of a moving truck is not ordinarily climate-controlled. Therefore, the excessive heat inside the trailer in the summer could mean an explosive butane cylinder would be at risk of exploding. Propane cylinders, cans of gasoline or diesel, aerosol cans, and even tiki torch fuel are examples of prohibited items.

4. Live Plants

Live plants do not necessarily pose any risks, but most moving companies do prohibit the transport of live plants for a few reasons:

5. Personal or Sentimental Items

You should keep sentimental or personally vital items with you during your move. Moving companies won’t transport these items. 

Professional movers should not move things like keepsakes, expensive jewelry, family heirlooms, coin collections, and other valuables. Whether the things in question are valuable art pieces, cherished family photos, lovely jewelry, or other precious items, plan to move these valued items carefully on your own

Talk to Your Mover

As you prepare for moving day, make sure you take care of the personal belongings the pros may not. Be sure to get a complete list of non-allowable items from your moving company in advance to avoid any issues on moving day. 

Getting ready to move and still need a moving company? Reach out to us to get a free quote for your move today.

Staging On a Budget: 6 Low-Cost Ways To Prepare Your Home For Sale

Staging your home before listing it to sell can lead to bigger offers and may help your home sell faster than it would otherwise. The best part? You can stage your home cost-effectively, with just a little effort. Staging your home when you’re selling it is essential, even if you have to do it on a tight budget. 

These six staging tips can help you prepare your home for sale.

1. Paint!

Painting is one way to make your home look cleaner and more well-maintained, and since you can paint as a DIY project, you can do it relatively inexpensively. Keep your painting expenses low by choosing just a few rooms to paint rather than painting the entire interior of your house. Most prospective buyers prefer neutral colors, so choose a color that is flattering but not too bright. Beige, gray, white, and cream are the safest if you’re planning to sell.

2. Make Small Repairs

Take care of that deferred maintenance, like the broken doorknob and the little hole in the drywall behind your front door. Small maintenance problems are a blemish on your home and can be a red flag for home buyers, so making these repairs in advance of putting up the for sale sign can help ensure that your home will make a good impression.

3. Clean Deeply

Prepare your home by giving it a deep cleaning. Take the time to clean the windows, vacuum the blinds, wash the curtains and address cleaning challenges that you don’t usually take on. A clean home is a beautiful home, so the more time you spend cleaning before home showings, the better and more impressive your home will be for buyers. Best of all, you don’t need a lot of money to clean your home – you just need time and elbow grease.

4. Declutter

Clutter can make your home look small, dark, and claustrophobic, depending on how much clutter you have accumulated. Clutter can also make your home harder to clean, which makes it less impressive to homeowners. You can fix this problem by getting rid of items before you list your home for sale.

  • Sort through old bills and magazines, recycle or throw away what isn’t needed.
  • Give away items that you no longer use but which are still useful.
  • Sell that which still has value, but you no longer need or don’t want to take to your new home.

Decluttering is a necessary process that can take months, so get your start early. When your house is listed, having spent time decluttering will help ensure that your home looks its best. Another benefit of decluttering when you set out to stage your home is that it helps with the packing process. Packing for your move goes so much smoother when you have decluttered first.

5. Use Props

If you don’t have them, buy small props to make your house look cozier. Candles, throw pillows, blankets, and a lovely ceramic bowl for holding fruit can all be used to make your home look inviting and cheerful without breaking the bank.

6. Set Up Little Vignettes

Finally, before any buyers see your home, set up little vignettes that help home buyers imagine themselves spending time in your property. A vase of fresh flowers next to a set table, for example, can help buyers imagine sitting down to dinner or having a dinner party.

Staging Will Help You Sell Faster

Making these small changes won’t cost you thousands of dollars but will help you sell your home more quickly. The more successful the home sale, the better the moving process will be overall. When it’s time to move, hire a professional moving company to make your project a success.

Contact us today for a free quote.

Safely Moving With Your Pets

Moving is complex. With so many moving parts to juggle, it’s no wonder that many people find it stressful.

When you add pets into the mix, the stress only increases — for both humans and their furry friends. After all, pets don’t understand why their humans are running around, packing familiar items into boxes for hours on end.

The good news is that you can take steps to ease those non-human family members’ moving process. These tips will help you move with pets.

That’s a Crate Idea

If your dog or cat isn’t used to being in a crate, start getting them acclimated well before the move. Riding in a crate isn’t just the best way for pets to travel in a car. It’s also a safe place for them while movers are going in and out of your house.

Begin the acclimation process by placing their food in the crate. Leave the door open so they can go in and out. Move on to feeding them inside with the door closed.

Now that they’re used to the crate start taking them for drives. Start with short rides of about 10 minutes, then gradually work up to longer rides.

Be sure to create a good experience, incorporating praise and the occasional treat. Before long, your pet will make positive associations with the crate. You’ll be ready to keep them safe (and crated) when moving day rolls around.

Keep Calm and Carry On

We understand: Moving can be stressful. It’s stressful for pets, too. Dogs and cats are attuned to your mood, so if you raise your voice, your anxiety can easily rub off on them.

Giving yourself plenty of time to prep for the move can help. Start packing early (days or weeks, if you can) to keep your anxiety level low. Gradual, rather than sudden, changes make it easier for pets to adapt.

A Bag of Their Own

Set aside a special bag just for your pet. Make a list of everything your pet will need for moving day, traveling, and the first few days in your new house.

Set this bag securely aside and make sure it stays with you, rather than going on the moving truck. Your pet’s bag might include:

  • Food and treats
  • Food and water bowls
  • Toys
  • Grooming implements
  • Medicine and vaccination records
  • Kitty litter and box
  • Extra leash and poop bags

Pet-Proofed

If you can, visit your new home and make sure it’s pet-proofed before moving day. That means ensuring that the yard is secure with a fence free of holes. Look for any plants that might be toxic to pets, too.

Inside, tuck away any dangling cords and make sure windows screens are secure. Finally, try to identify potential hiding places in case your furry friends decide to hide out.

Taking these steps in advance can help reduce your stress level — and your pet’s anxiety — on moving day. Keeping these furry family members safe is an essential key to a successful move.

Feels Like Home

Settle In

When at your new home, avoid letting your pet wander freely to explore the new house. A unique, unfamiliar setting might be overwhelming for them.

Cats might adjust better if placed in a single room to be their home-base. Include their water and food bowls, favorite toys, pet bed, treats, litter box. This will allow them to adjust to their new surroundings slowly. Gradually introduce them to the other rooms of the house when they seem ready.

Dogs might do well on a leash inside at first, eventually moving their comfort items to similar locations as the old house, like the food and water near the back door or dog bed in the family room.

On the Move

Are you preparing for a family move? We can help make yours a smooth transition. Contact us today for a quote.

Cleaning Tips When Moving Out of a Rental

Whether you are moving out of a rental house or an apartment, you most likely need to clean the place before you hand it over to the next occupant – especially if you are looking to have a security deposit returned. 

Getting organized and making a plan is essential to the success of your move. Unfortunately, for most movers, the cleanup stage of the process is a challenge. 

Here are some tips that can make it easier for you.

Tips for Cleaning After You Move Out

1. Find out what your landlord’s cleaning policy is.

Many landlords provide tenants with a move-out inspection sheet which includes exactly what you need to clean to get your security deposit returned.

It may be tempting to grab the scrub brush and get to cleaning, but hold off for a minute. Some landlords, particularly in apartment complexes, include a cleaning fee in the rental agreement – a fee that you will have to pay regardless of whether you clean or not.

If you are going to have to pay a cleaning fee, you still may need to do some general cleaning depending on the wording of the lease. But only do what is necessary since you are paying a cleaner regardless.

2. Get the right cleaning supplies.

Trying to clean the whole place with a rag and some cleaning spray is not the way to go. Proper cleaning supplies are relatively inexpensive and make the work faster and more thorough. Here are a few of the supplies you should consider:

  • Rubber or latex gloves
  • Mop and mop bucket
  • Broom
  • Brushes
  • Cloths
  • Glass cleaners
  • Paper towels
  • Magic erasers
  • Cleaning products – toilet bowl cleaner, disinfectant spray, oven cleaner, etc.

3. Make a plan.

You don’t want to miss anything important. It’s helpful to create a list of things that need cleaning so you can make sure you get all of them. Some things you might want to include on your list are:

  • Windows
  • Bathroom
  • Bedrooms
  • Kitchen
  • Oven
  • Refrigerator
  • Living Room
  • Dining room
  • Carpets
  • Tile
  • Surfaces
  • Walls

PRO TIP: Plan to transport your vacuum cleaner last on your final trip out of your rental. That way you will have it at your rental property to make a final pass on the floors as you head out the door.

4. Remove nails and patch the walls.

Your gallery wall may have looked outstanding in your rental, but now the wall is left with nails and holes. It’s time to remove the nails and patch up the holes left behind. Use commercial putty to fill in the holes and paint in the same color as your wall. Check with your landlord to see if they will provide this matching paint. to restore it to its original state. Be sure to use a putty knife to prop

5. Don’t forget to clean outside.

If you have an exterior space that is included with your rental property, such as a porch, garage, or yard, you will want to make sure it’s cleaned as well. You might need to clean up the yard and mow, for example. It all depends on what your specific circumstances are. Just make sure that any area you are responsible for is cleaned so you aren’t knocked for it later.

6. Consider hiring a cleaning service.

Not everyone is willing or able to go on a cleaning spree. You might prefer to have someone else do it, either out of necessity or because you just want to make sure it’s done right. A cleaning service can help you out for a fee. The right cleaning service will be able to clean everything we have discussed here and then some, so it might be worth it to talk to a few and get some estimates. You may discover that it makes more sense for you to pay some money and save some time and effort.

Moving? Contact Us!

If you are moving we would like to help. Please contact our professional moving team today to discuss your options and find out what we can do for you.

Getting organized and making a plan is essential to the success of your move. Unfortunately, for most movers, the cleanup stage of the process is a challenge. 

Here are some tips that can make it easier for you.

Tips for Cleaning After You Move Out

1. Find out what your landlord’s cleaning policy is.

Many landlords provide tenants with a move-out inspection sheet which includes exactly what you need to clean to get your security deposit returned.

It may be tempting to grab the scrub brush and get to cleaning, but hold off for a minute. Some landlords, particularly in apartment complexes, include a cleaning fee in the rental agreement – a fee that you will have to pay regardless of whether you clean or not.

If you are going to have to pay a cleaning fee, you still may need to do some general cleaning depending on the wording of the lease. But only do what is necessary since you are paying a cleaner regardless.

2. Get the right cleaning supplies.

Trying to clean the whole place with a rag and some cleaning spray is not the way to go. Proper cleaning supplies are relatively inexpensive and make the work faster and more thorough. Here are a few of the supplies you should consider:

  • Rubber or latex gloves
  • Mop and mop bucket
  • Broom
  • Brushes
  • Cloths
  • Glass cleaners
  • Paper towels
  • Magic erasers
  • Cleaning products – toilet bowl cleaner, disinfectant spray, oven cleaner, etc.

3. Make a plan.

You don’t want to miss anything important. It’s helpful to create a list of things that need cleaning so you can make sure you get all of them. Some things you might want to include on your list are:

  • Windows
  • Bathroom
  • Bedrooms
  • Kitchen
  • Oven
  • Refrigerator
  • Living Room
  • Dining room
  • Carpets
  • Tile
  • Surfaces
  • Walls

PRO TIP: Plan to transport your vacuum cleaner last on your final trip out of your rental. That way you will have it at your rental property to make a final pass on the floors as you head out the door.

4. Remove nails and patch the walls.

Your gallery wall may have looked outstanding in your rental, but now the wall is left with nails and holes. It’s time to remove the nails and patch up the holes left behind. Use commercial putty to fill in the holes and paint in the same color as your wall. Check with your landlord to see if they will provide this matching paint. to restore it to its original state. Be sure to use a putty knife to prop

5. Don’t forget to clean outside.

If you have an exterior space that is included with your rental property, such as a porch, garage, or yard, you will want to make sure it’s cleaned as well. You might need to clean up the yard and mow, for example. It all depends on what your specific circumstances are. Just make sure that any area you are responsible for is cleaned so you aren’t knocked for it later.

6. Consider hiring a cleaning service.

Not everyone is willing or able to go on a cleaning spree. You might prefer to have someone else do it, either out of necessity or because you just want to make sure it’s done right. A cleaning service can help you out for a fee. The right cleaning service will be able to clean everything we have discussed here and then some, so it might be worth it to talk to a few and get some estimates. You may discover that it makes more sense for you to pay some money and save some time and effort.

Moving? Contact Us!

If you are moving we would like to help. Please contact our professional moving team today to discuss your options and find out what we can do for you.

4 Ways for You to Prepare for Your Move in 2021

Moving takes a lot of time and preparation. If you’re planning to relocate sometime later this year, then now is the time to start planning. Laying your plans and getting organized now is one way that you can make your upcoming relocation easier and more successful.

1. Start Collecting Packing Supplies

It’s easy to underestimate how many packing supplies you’ll need during your upcoming relocation. Start collecting packing supplies now to ensure that you have enough when it’s time to begin packing. Having enough boxes, scissors, permanent markers, packing tape, and bubble wrap makes it easier to pack efficiently when the packing gets started.

When you’re buying packing supplies, buy more boxes, scissors, tape, and permanent markers than you think you’ll need. You’ll be glad you did. Keeping these materials in multiple rooms of the house helps ensure that you’ll always be able to find what you need to close up a box when it’s full.

2. Eliminate Clutter

Clutter is your enemy during a relocation. Clutter makes packing slower and can make moving just a bit more expensive. If you can get rid of your clutter now, before your relocation takes place, then your relocation will cost less and will probably be less stressful as well. 

Eliminating clutter takes time – the more clutter you have, the more time it takes. Start now to avoid a time crunch. Donating items to charity, selling items on the Internet, and giving things away to friends and family can help clear your closets and make packing easier when the time comes.

3. Get Home Maintenance Out of the Way

Do you own your home? If so, you’ll want to get the most out of your home sale when your house is listed on the market. Get home maintenance out of the way now to make your house more attractive and valuable to buyers.

  • Take care of any deferred maintenance first.
  • Put a fresh coat of paint on rooms with walls painted in colors that are dated.
  • Shampoo your home’s carpets.
  • Remodel a room to boost your home’s value.

Not sure what kind of home improvements to prioritize? Talk to a real estate professional to find out what you can do to make your home worth as much as possible in your area.

4. Make a Moving Timeline

Moving requires a lot of steps, from decluttering to packing to finding a moving company. If you haven’t found your new home yet, that’s another thing you’ll need to focus on in the coming months! 

Make a moving timeline now, so you’ll know when to get done with the items on your to-do list. Mark your calendar with each milestone you need to complete in order to move by the necessary date.

Share your moving timeline with members of your household so that everyone is on the same page. Once everyone knows their role and when they need to complete the items on their checklist, your relocation will be more successful.

Find a Moving Company You Can Trust

It’s important to find a moving company you can trust. The best movers book up early, so plan to start interviewing movers soon, even if you won’t be moving for several months. This will help ensure you’re prepared for your relocation.

We can help with your relocation. Contact us today for a quote.

5 Moving Tips For Seniors That Help Make Downsizing A Positive Experience

Downsizing into a more affordable and easy to manage living space can provide wonderful benefits for aging community members. Less maintenance and fewer repairs allow more time to relax. And the lowered cost of a smaller home, apartment, or condominium opens the door for improved quality of life activities.

While downsizing has many proven benefits, the process of reducing personal belongings and transitioning can be stressful. Living in a larger home usually means you have the material goods to match. 

If the possibility of downsizing and moving into a more manageable space seems unwieldy, consider these five ways to transition smoothly.

1. Consider the Square Footage Differences

When moving to a modest living space, it’s essential to have a firm grasp of what will fit comfortably. 

Start by taking detailed measurements of your current rooms and comparing them to the downsized counterparts. The key to effectively transitioning revolves around everything you bring fitting with room to move around. 

Downsizing typically requires less bulky furniture or space-efficient replacements. Knowing how much room you have to work with can make a big difference on moving day.

2. Stage Your Furniture and Belongings To Fit

Now that you know how much square footage you have to work with consider rearranging your current living space as a model. 

Gather a few friends or family members and mark floors with tape to reflect the new space. Now spend a little time arranging tables, chairs, couches, and other belongings as if they were in the downsized residence. This process gives you a true sense of what to keep and what won’t fit.

3. Ask Yourself Which Belongings Matter

Not all material items are equal in a person’s eyes or heart. Just because an oversized chair is past its prime, it may hold greater sentimental value than a brand new recliner. The same holds for many items that bring back memories of good times, loved ones we miss or have lost along the way. 

Rather than set aside those emotions, and pack what will fit, ask yourself these important questions.

  • Is this something I need, or want?
  • What is the sentimental value of this item?
  • How often do I use it?

Based on your answers, you can decide what your moving professionals transport to the new home. The other items may have different destinations.

4: Consider Alternatives For Keepsakes and Valued Items

Pre-planning aspects of how to manage personal belongings tend to be increasingly important for seniors when downsizing. With that in mind, items that may not fit into a smaller space can be handled in several suitable ways. These may include the following.

  • Consider storing sentimental items with children or relatives.
  • Consider inexpensive self-storage until you are ready to part with personal items.
  • Consider passing on family heirlooms so that others can enjoy them.
  • Downsizing your household does not necessarily mean that you will no longer have cherished items. It merely means those that might clutter your new place need to be safely stored offsite or with loved ones.

5: Preparing For Moving Day

After you have boxed up goods and pre-planned, it’s essential to label each possession and note where it will go. Professional movers like getting it right and making your transition seamless. By marking boxes by room and indicating furniture placement, moving day can be stress-free. Planning and communication with your moving company mean you will get settled in quickly and enjoy an enhanced quality of life.

Moving Made Easy

If you need moving help, contact us. We can help with packing, storage, transport, and even unpacking. We can make your downsizing move as stress-free as possible.

5 Ways to Label Moving Boxes So You Know Exactly What’s There

Is your household move starting to feel overwhelming? Are you imagining your new home, full of boxes, and if they have all ended up in their intended unpacking location? And, do you know what’s inside each one?

When tackling a move, your labeling approach makes a big difference in the way you unpack. It can set the mood for the first month in your new home.

You’ll need a way to know exactly what each box contains. If you use a combination of these five ideas, that’s what you’ll get.

1. Buy Labels

Most official moving boxes come printed with a square for labeling. That doesn’t mean it’s the best or only choice when it comes to labeling.

Investing in moving labels can make the marker ink show up better, making it easier to read.

Aim for products that have some weather resistance. That way, if they get wet, the ink won’t run.

2. Print Big

Once you stack the boxes, you’ll be looking at them from a distance. That means you and the movers will need to be able to read it.

Imagine you work for a moving company. You would need to know what to do with the box within a second or two.

Choose a permanent marker with a broad tip in a dark color. Write clearly and keep the words short. Simple language is easier for workers to decipher.

3. Use Color-Coding

Writing the designated room on the box may not be enough. If you want to make sure every box ends up in the right room, you may also want to use a color code.

You can buy boxes of moving labels with color-coded stickers for each room. You can also purchase different rolls of duct tape and put a strip along opposite edges of the box.

Color coding may not make as much sense on a large scale. If you have to distinguish between three different shades of blue, you probably need another system.

4. Identify Location and Contents

Make sure every label includes the name of the room that each box should be placed in. 

Keep in mind that some of your labeling efforts help you more than the movers. When you’re ready to unpack, you don’t want to guess which of these 20 boxes has the item you need.

While you pack, give yourself enough time to write down the general theme of each box. If you have five boxes of dishware, outline which one has the plates and which one has the mugs.

Detailed labeling is even more important if someone else is unpacking for you. They’re less likely to damage or misplace stuff that way.

5. Write on Multiple Sides

By the time you finish packing, you may have many tall stacks of boxes. Perhaps you’ll have a whole room or storage unit full of them.

Do you have any idea what’s inside? How would you get to them if you needed to read the label on top?

Put the most basic information on at least two sides, as well as the top. That way, you can tell at a glance where it will need to go. Make sure you label more than the top of the box. When the boxes are stacked, you won’t be able to see the label at all!

Make the Move Right

If you’re going to live amongst boxes for the next couple of months, you might as well do it on your terms. With these labeling tips and tricks, you’ll know just where to find everything you need.

Contact us today. We can help with your moving logistics.